Theatre Journal Special Issues Call for Papers for 2022

Call for Papers

Special Issue for September 2022: Installation

“More than any other artwork, installation requires the actual presence of the spectator. . . . this artistic practice is essentially a sensorial experience that the entire body is supposed to encounter.” - Itzhak Goldberg, Installations (2019)

 

How do we theorize installation through performance and vice versa? Various genealogies of installation art trace its origins to European modernism (e.g., futurism) or mid-century American experimentation (e.g., Allan Kaprow), but we might trace installation more broadly across 

architecture, biennials, galleries, museums, protests, public art projects, world expositions, and more. From the polka dots of Yayoi Kusama to the machines of Kris Verdonck to the nightclubs of the duo that comprise FAKA (Fela Gucci and Desire Marea), installations complicate ostensible divisions between subject and object. They raise questions not only about what we perceive but also how. 

Installation usually connotes transience; the temporality of installations frequently evokes political questions. Here we might think of the controversial work of Brett Bailey. Beyond particular artworks, the Strike MOMA campaign has led to consideration of New York’s Museum of Modern Art as a large-scale installation that signifies and furthers “colonial-capitalist modernity.” What happens when installations endure?

Acknowledging that Theatre Journal has explored different aspects of art, display, museums, and visuality in relation to theatre, this issue aims both to broaden and to deepen these discussions. Contributors might consider other facets of the normative or non-normative human (or non-human) sensorium in relation to space. Essays historicizing and/or theorizing installation in different contexts are welcome. 

This special issue will be edited by Theatre Journal editor Sean Metzger. We will consider both full length essays for the print edition (6,000-9,000 words) as well as proposals for short provocations, video and/or photo essays, and other creative, multimedia material for our on-line platform (500-2,000 words). For information about submission, visit: https://www.jhuptheatre.org/theatre-journal/author-guidelines

 

Submissions for the print journal (6,000-9,000 words) and for the online platform (500-2,000 words) should reach us no later than 1 December 2021.

Submit via ScholarOne:

https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/theatrejournal

Feel free to contact the editors with questions or inquiries:

Sean Metzger, Editor at smetzger@tft.ucla.edu

Carla Neuss, Online Editor at carla.neuss@yale.edu

 

 

Call for Papers

Special Issue for December 2021: Pathologies & Performance

As we mourn our losses, grapple with harsh inequities exposed and exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic, and yearn for a post-Covid moment that might never arrive, Theatre Journal calls for essays that explore the intersection of performance and pathology. This special issue seeks to contribute to an anticipated wave of interdisciplinary scholarship that rejects the instrumentalization of the arts reflected in the medical humanities and instead delves into the profound social and political imbrications of medicine, disease, and illness in the context of the visual, literary, and performing arts. 

This issue seeks to build upon the significant work that theatre and performance studies scholars have already accomplished, yielding generative terms such as the “medical body,” “embodied pathographies,” and “dramatist-as-pathologist.” The framework of pathology is meant to invoke not only its most common definition—the medical study of diseases—but also its more expansive etymology. Pathology comes from the Greek word pathología, meaning the study of suffering, and thus speaks to how illness and disease intersect with passion, affect, and lifeworlds. The term is also meant to invoke the visceral impact of pathogens as a life force, as Patrick Anderson has movingly addressed.

Illness disables and debilitates bodies, and thus a critical framework of pathology owes a considerable intellectual debt to disability studies. In the landmark anthology Bodies in Commotion, Carrie Sandahl and Phil Auslander emphasize the violence that medical models have wreaked on nonnormative bodies, noting that disability studies aim at “peeling away the label of pathology with its comcomitant demand for cure.” Indeed, a central aim of disability studies is to depathologize individuals and communities. But in recognition of our hyper- medicalized moment, this issue shifts focus to pathology and seeks to consider what medical models have to offer theatre and performance beyond violence and harm—while recognizing that the violence continues apace particularly upon Black female and trans* bodies.

In the wake of the “converging pandemics” of Covid-19 and anti-Blackness, the time is more than ripe for new conceptualizations that contend with the expansiveness and porosity of what Susan Sontag famously called the “kingdom of the sick.” How might frameworks of pathology, illness, and/or disease revitalize expand our understandings of performance? How might a focus on illness confront the insidiousness of structural forms of violence and the necropolitics of “letting die”? How might the seepage of infectious disease across borders impact our understandings of transnational theatre history? In addition to the silencing force of pathogens in relation to the shutdown of commercial theatre—from early modern London to Broadway in 2020—how might we conceptualize illness and disease as a generative, creative force? Theatre Journal encourages a wide range of essays that explore the performance of pathology and/or the pathologies of performance. We especially invite analyses that are attuned to processes of pathologization and how those processes have been understood and iterated differently across historical eras and geographies.

This special issue will be edited by Theatre Journal co-editor Laura Edmondson, who welcomes inquiries regarding potential submissions at Laura.Edmondson@dartmouth.edu. We will consider both full length essays for the print edition (6,000-9,000 words) as well as proposals for short provocations, video and/or photo essays, and other creative, multimedia material for our on-line platform (500-2,000 words). For information about submission, visit: https://www.jhuptheatre.org/theatre-journal/author-guidelines

 

Submissions for the print journal (6,000-9,000 words) and for the online platform (500-2,000 words) should reach us no later than February 1, 2022

Submit via ScholarOne:

https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/theatrejournal

Feel free to contact the editors with questions or inquiries:

Sean Metzger, Editor at smetzger@tft.ucla.edu

Carla Neuss, Online Editor at carla.neuss@yale.edu